russell grant astrology horoscopesAstrologer Russell Grant made history in 1978 when he became the first person in 400 years to publicly give an astrological consultation to the British Royal Family. The media immediately dubbed him “Astrologer Royal”.

Russell Grant’s life changed overnight after the Queen Mother visited his exhibit at the Ideal Home Exhibition and he presented her with her own astrological chart. Grant’s rise to fame was “meteoric”.

His “Daily Stars” astrology/horoscope column was instantly syndicated to over 450 newspapers world-wide and he was signed by Granada Television to become the first daytime astrologer on British TV.

Tina Brown, editor of Tatler, signed Russell to write the astro-column for the popular magazine. From that moment on Russell was the apple of society’s eye. He travelled to New York to front a similar exhibition at the Lincoln Center and appeared on many TV and radio programs including Good Morning America.

In 1984 Russell was honored with an invitation to appear at a Royal Command Performance at the Victoria Palace in front of The Queen Mother and Princess Diana.

The cuddly astrologer became a confidante and “most trusted friend” to Princess Di, according to Paul Burrell, Diana’s secretary. Grant never revealed this relationship until after Burrell’s book.

Russell Grant was born on February 5, 1951 in Middlesex, England and raised by his “Granny”. His parents worked at the famous Pinewood Film Studios and divorced early in his life.

Grant is not only considered British Royalty when it comes to astrology; he actually holds the 1,000 year old royal title of Lord of the Manor of Ashford in Middlesex.

One of astrology’s bona fide characters, “Mr Middlesex” is openly homosexual with a partner of 35 years – “Oh Dahling, the first time I explored Doug’s astral, I knew he was for me.”

Doug Beaumont runs Grant’s website which gets 120 million hits a month. The email-a-psychic service costs $75 or you can call a guardian angel for $4 a minute.

Grant is founder of the Middlesex Family Foundation, which links all the Middlesex-named places around the world together. He has his own officially recognised charity: WISE (Wales, Ireland, Scotland and England) Communities, and works for research into cures for Alzheimer’s and dementia.

At 12 years of age Russell landed the first of his many roles on television, and began performing on stage, and was for many years a successful bit player and character actor. Hosting a television show for Great Britain in New York, he moved to America’s Fox television.

He’s best known as the ebullient, roly-poly astrologer, friend of Princess Di, prancing around in oversized smocks as the face of Eighties morning TV. As the producers suggested ever more outlandish costumes; Grant tired. “I’ve played my own role to death”, he said, “I would like to be somebody else now…maybe, Mel Gibson.”

Having suffered a heart attack, Grant admits to severe bouts of depression and takes anti-depressants. He says that for two years after his “Granny” died he had trouble getting out of bed in the morning “…and when I did, it was just to wonder what was the point of it all”.

She had Alzheimer’s and was nursed by Grant in her last years. “It was heartbreaking. Can you imagine having to wash your own grandmother down and she’s standing there naked but for a string of pearls? That is why I’m such a radical now about finding a cure.”

He began his study of astrology as a youth with Rita Szymanski, the then treasurer of the Astrological Lodge of Great Britain. Russell was a notable medium/clairvoyant before he stepped into the astrological limelight.

In 1994 Russell was one of the first sites online and became a hit across the internet with his “Daily Stars” horoscopes. His Web site www.russellgrant.com currently draws up to ten million visitors every month while over 100,000 people get their daily horoscopes delivered by e-mail to their desktops. His Illustrated Dream dictionary has been a best seller and translated into over twenty languages.

Russell Grant is now working on a new TV project called “Cosmic House” where with the help of builders, architects and gardeners will be restoring a property from scratch using astrology, feng shui and herbals (for the garden). As Russell Grant says, “The trouble with astrology is, If you get it wrong, it’s rubbish; if you get it right, you’re bogus.”

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